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Ahead of World Kindness Day on 13th November, now more than ever I think we all need practice and display good deeds and altruism.

In an ever more digitally connected world, where things can’t seem to go fast enough, should we pause and take a moment to notice the people around us and give them a bit of our time and appreciation?

Psychologists maintain that acts of kindness produce endorphins helping to promote a ripple effect of kindnessDr. George Fieldman, a Psychologist specialising in altruism, has strong views on the effects of good deeds on society.

Dr. Fieldman says, “A random act of kindness is doing something spontaneous and generous to someone without expecting anything back in return. Science shows us that people who act altruistically tend to be happier, healthier and, in fact, to live longer themselves. Societies that embrace altruism foster cultures in which people become integrated, co-operative and empowered, which is of benefit to us all.”

 

 Here are more reasons why Dr. Fieldman believes we should be practicing altruism,

“An act of kindness is likely to make the giver feel good about themselves and the receiver to feel empowered and valued.”

“Societies that embrace altruism foster cultures in which people become integrated, co-operative and empowered, which is of benefit to us all.”
“A random act of kindness is doing something spontaneous and generous to someone without expecting anything back in return.”

“There are numerous studies which show that being kind or being on the receiving end of kindness leads to an increase in the production of seratonin which is known as the ‘feel-good’ hormone and is instrumental in regulating moods and leads to that ‘self-satisfaction’ feeling. When you are kind to others, you feel good as a person.”

Why aren’t we more altruistic?

‘This can be down to our surroundings. Someone who was born and bred in a tight knit community might be less suspicious of a random act of kindness than someone who was born in a massive anonymous city.’The anonymity of a large city might make people more suspicious of a random act of kindness. Londoners and people in other big cities are likely to be hesitant and more suspicious about receiving acts of kindness more than people in smaller communities. Because of a degree of mutual suspiciousness, people may be more hesitant about giving acts of kindness, and they will also be more suspicious about receiving it.’

 
An act of kindness can take as little as 5 seconds; whether it’s holding the door for someone or sharing an umbrella with a stranger. We would all be so much happier if we paused and took notice of other people. ​
InterFlora wants to spread acts of kindness for World Kindness Day. Taking to the streets of London, Interflora conducted a mini social experiment and put the public to the test by presenting them with a single flower and asking them to pass it on, all in the name of kindness. The results are truly heartwarming. You can see the video here:  www.interflora.co.uk/content/world-kindnessday
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Interflora has put together 10 random acts of kindness to inspire you to go out and spread a little kindness

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